How to Help a Desoxyn Addict

  1. Table of ContentsPrint
  2. How Can I Get Someone I Love to Accept Help?
  3. What Can I Expect in Desoxyn Abuse Treatment?
  4. Is Desoxyn Addictive?

man holding pill bottle
Desoxyn is a drug prescribed to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and, more rarely, as an emergent intervention for cases of intractable obesity. As a stimulant medication, it increases energy, alertness, and wakefulness 1,2.

You may be surprised to learn that Desoxyn is actually methamphetamine. It is the only remaining marketed pharmaceutical containing methamphetamine 1.

Stimulant abuse is a major problem in the U.S. More than 1.6 million people in the U.S. admitted to using stimulants, like methamphetamine, in the last month 4.


How Can I Get Someone I Love to Accept Help?

If you worry that someone close to you is one of the 1.6 million people abusing a stimulant, proceed compassionately but carefully. You are unlikely to help if you are overly confrontational or react strongly without a plan.

Learn About Stimulant Abuse

People abusing Desoxyn may refer to it in street terms like 1:

  • Meth.
  • Crank.
  • Speed.

You will fare better in attempting to positively approach a loved one if you do so from an educated standpoint.

You can explore information related to Desoxyn abuse and stimulant abuse, in general, to gain a better understanding of the larger issue and how your loved one is affected. First, note that your loved one may also be abusing methamphetamine that is illicitly manufactured, which may produce more intense and unpredictable effects than Desoxyn itself 4. They may also use other prescription stimulants, such as Adderall, or illicit drugs like cocaine in place of Desoxyn when it is not available, and thus give rise to additional symptoms. For more information on symptoms you might come across, see our Stimulants Abuse page.

You’ll also need to understand a general picture of substance abuse and addiction so that you have appropriate expectations. If you expect your loved one to quit immediately because you ask them to, you likely will be disappointed. Drug abuse can change the brain of the user over time, impair self-control, and make quitting without help an extremely challenging prospect 5.

Practice communication. Now is the time to approach your loved one. To do so, come from a position of love, support, and encouragement to increase your chances of success. Be aware that your loved one may not be honest with you because of the shame, fear, anger, and denial associated with their drug use.

During your communication 6:

  • Stay calm and patient. Being angry or judgmental will lead to defensiveness from your loved one.
  • Ask many questions to help elicit your loved one’s own feelings about their substance use.
  • Establish your role as an aid and teammate to encourage honesty.
  • Remind your loved one that you care about them a great deal and emphasize their strengths and positive traits.
  • Consistently state your view that professional treatment is needed to manage substance abuse.
  • Discuss what you want them to do, how you are willing to help, and what limits will be set if they choose not to get help.

Establish your role as an aid and teammate to encourage honesty.

If you need help communicating with your loved one in a positive way, there are avenues you can take to learn the skills to help motivate your loved one to find treatment while also getting support for yourself. These include:

  • Community reinforcement and family training—Specialized training that helps loved ones to identify issues that contribute to substance use, learn to communicate effectively, and learn to take care of themselves 7.
  • Family therapy—Therapy that involves close loved ones to heal the whole family unit and increase the chances of sustained recovery.
  • Support groups for loved ones of addicts (e.g., Al-Anon)—A supportive environment of people who have similar struggles in watching a loved one fight addiction.

Should I Try an Intervention?

People wanting to get their loved one into treatment often consider interventions as a way of doing so. A formal intervention is a planned meeting between the person engaging in substance use and the important people in their life. During this meeting, the loved ones will state how they have been negatively impacted by Desoxyn abuse and what they intend to do if use continues 5.

Strong emotions like anger and hostility may emerge due to the confrontational nature of the meeting 5. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) advises avoiding confrontational interventions like those you see on TV, in favor of steps like incentivizing your loved one to see a doctor about treatment. However, when the stakes are high and serious injury or death is likely to result, an intervention may be your best option.

To lessen the possibility that these negative emotions will arise and deter the meeting, you may wish to utilize the services of a professional interventionist. They can help you plan the event and ensure that communication stays on track for the best possible outcome.


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What Can I Expect in Desoxyn Abuse Treatment?

The most intense use of Desoxyn could require inpatient detoxification services to manage symptoms of withdrawal, which can include 8:

  • Extreme depression with potential for suicidality.
  • Anger and aggression with risk for violence.

When the drug has been cleared from the body, the focus moves from managing withdrawal to treating the issues behind the addiction. Therapeutic approaches may include one or more of the following 8,9,10:

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—A therapeutic style that links connections between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors to understand and prevent substance use.
  • Motivational interviewing (MI)—An approach that builds the addict’s desire to change and commit to actions that match their goals.
  • Contingency management (CM)—A treatment style that rewards and reinforces many behaviors related to recovery to build a strong association between abstaining from drugs and positive feelings.

people in group therapy session

The Matrix Model is a treatment designed exclusively for people abusing stimulants like methamphetamine, with encouraging rates of success. With the goal of building self-esteem and dignity, this model utilizes techniques from other treatments including elements of 10:

  • Relapse prevention.
  • Individual therapy.
  • Family therapy.
  • Education.
  • Drug tests.
  • Self-help groups.


Is Desoxyn Addictive?

Yes. Desoxyn is essentially methamphetamine, which is notoriously addictive. The drug’s abuse potential is well known, yet with its recognized, albeit limited therapeutic uses, the medication is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance.

Desoxyn is essentially methamphetamine, which is notoriously addictive.

Desoxyn’s addictive potential is linked to the drug’s effect on the brain. When consumed, Desoxyn and other stimulants trigger an increased release of neurotransmitters, including dopamine. The release of excess dopamine creates rewarding feelings that over time prompt the user to prioritize drug use over other activities, even as negative consequences mount 1,2,3.

What Are the Signs of Addiction?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, in 2014, of the 1.6 million that admitted to previous month stimulant abuse, about 570,000 were abusing methamphetamine.

If you’re worried about someone you love, first check for signs of Desoxyn intoxication. These typically include 1,8:

  • Increased energy.
  • Increased alertness.
  • Decreased appetite.
  • Euphoria.
  • Higher body temperature.

As use increases due to tolerance, people may show additional signs of abuse like 1,8:

  • Irritability.
  • Aggression.
  • Anxiety and panic.
  • Paranoia.
  • Excessive weight loss.

The person may show new or worsening signs of mental health disorders like manic symptoms associated with bipolar disorder, depression, and psychosis 8.

Am I Addicted to Desoxyn?

Acknowledging your addiction to Desoxyn can be much more complex than seeing a problem in another person, especially if you are prescribed the medication. However, certain signs can help you determine whether you have a problem.

You may be addicted to Desoxyn if you 5:

  • Take more of the substance than prescribed or in ways other than intended.
  • Have made unsuccessful attempts to end use.
  • Spend a lot of time, energy, and money trying to acquire and use Desoxyn.
  • Experience more conflict with people in your life because of your use.
  • Struggle to complete your responsibilities at home or work.
  • Do not feel well if you miss a dose or are without the drug.


Call Our Hotline Today

If you or someone you know needs help, it is time to take action. Addiction to methamphetamine can have severe and even fatal consequences. Call 1-888-744-0069 today.


References:

  1. Drug Enforcement Administration. (2013). Methamphetamine.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014). Research Report Series: Prescription Drug Abuse.
  3. National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens. (2016). Prescription Stimulant Medications (Amphetamines).
  4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2015). Behavioral Health Trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.
  5. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2016). What to Do If Your Adult Friend or Loved One Has a Problem with Drugs.
  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2015). Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse.
  7. Scruggs, S.M., Meyer, R, Kayo, R. (2014). Community Reinforcement and Family Training Support and Prevention.
  8. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (1999). Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders: Quick Guide for Clinicians.
  9. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2016). Drug Facts: Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction.
  10. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2012). Principles of Drug AddictionTreatment: A Research-Based Guide.
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