Disguising Danger: 7 Marijuana Edibles Shockers

Lots of the people who have tried marijuana have done so in the form of snacks like pot cookies or brownies. Since one of the effects of pot is an increased appetite, it’s only natural that the “ganja-preneurs” are marketing more marijuana edibles than ever before. From pot truffle oil to gummy bears, edibles are hot these days.

Unfortunately, the dangers of these drugs can be far worse than traditional marijuana.

Marijuana Edibles are a Completely Different Animal

EMS marijuana edibles

You’d be hard pressed to find tragic overdose deaths caused solely by weed. Marijuana edibles, on the other hand, have been unquestionably linked to multiple negative outcomes.

Before diving headlong into this relatively new market, you need to understand what edibles are and what they aren’t. At the very least, you’ll want to be proactive by getting familiar with the dangers these confections pose.

And on that note, let’s look at five very real problems and/or outcomes caused by the use, quantity and sale of marijuana edibles.

A Longer-Lasting High

Marijuana edibles produce a much longer-lasting and potent high than smoking, which can prove detrimental for novice users. Smoking pot produces a more immediate high that quickly dissipates, while edibles kick in after about an hour and the effects can last from six to 10 hours.

Serious Side Effects

Taken in large doses, marijuana edibles can lead to anxiety attacks, paranoia and hallucinations. Several case reports involving kids who took edibles found that respiratory insufficiency can also be a major side effect in young children.

They’ve Contributed to Tragedies

Marijuana bud

Marijuana edibles have played a major role in two recent cases.

Oklahoma native Caleb Fowler, 23, shot himself earlier this month after eating five times the recommended dosage of edibles. And last year, Wyoming college student Levy Thamba Pongi jumped to his death after eating a marijuana cookie. A coroner ruled that “marijuana intoxication” played a major role in the tragedy.

Lack of Safety in THC-Friendly States

Even in states where marijuana is legal, the lack of edible-specific regulations has caused public safety concerns. State officials in Colorado are now scrambling to create regulations regarding dosages of THC in the products, while more marijuana business owners are encouraging new users to “start low, go slow.”

Working Their Way into Schools

Perhaps because of the colorful packaging, even pre-teens are getting hold of edibles. Last April, a 10-year-old in Denver was busted for bringing edibles to school and three seventh-graders were hospitalized just one month earlier for eating pot-laced brownies at school.

In states where marijuana is legal, major restrictions have been placed on the sale, dosage and distribution of marijuana. It only makes sense that the same stipulations are now made for edibles in order to avoid more unnecessary health scares and potential tragedies.

Additional Reading: Now the Family Dog is Smoking Weed?