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Alta Bates Summit Medical Center - MPI Treatment Services

4.1 Great (7 Reviews) |
/
4.1
Treatment Effectiveness
Accommodations & Amenities
Meals & Nutrition
3012 Summit Street South Pavilion, 5th Floor
Oakland, California 94609

Services

  • Hospital

Facility Highlights

Nutritional Education

Relapse Prevention Skills

Exercise Program

Philosophy

MPI Chemical Dependency Treatment Services, which is a part of Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, provides affordable, high-quality substance abuse care to individuals in the Bay Area. The hospital-based facility offers detox, inpatient and outpatient services, and is dedicated to matching each client with the most appropriate and effective level of care. All programs include 12-Step introduction, addiction education and individual and family counseling.

Facility Center Details

  • Residential Treatment
  • Detox Services
  • Behavioral Disorder Treatment
  • Dual Diagnosis
  • Outpatient Services
  • Intensive Outpatient Services
  • Sober Living Home
  • Day School
  • Private Rooms
  • Pet Friendly
  • Exceptionally LGBT Friendly
  • Men Only
  • Women Only

Accreditation/License

  • CARF
  • JCAHO
  • ADP
  • NAATP

Disclaimer

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User Reviews

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1.7
N/A
f you're looking for a stressful and dirty environment and a chance of being overdosed, you've found the right place. According to one of MPI's very unprofessional nurses, management is no longer allowing unused vacation or sick time to be cashed out or rolled into another year. Employees must use or lose their time before year's end. Consequently, at any given point, half of the staff is out on vacation and replaced by what she termed "fly by night" incompetent temps. Because of the constant shifts in staff, there is extremely poor continuity of care. Connect with a counselor and two days later, he or she is replaced with a brittle and bossy fill-in. I attended MPI for detox services only, but during my seven days there, I encountered inept nurses with control issues who refused to share vitals with clients or medicate them on time. Several of the nurses there backstabbed each other and the counselors repeatedly in front of clients. It was unprofessional at best and toxic to clients at worst. My first three days in detox were uncomfortable but okay. This is most likely because I arrived just before the weekend. As soon as Monday arrived, someone repeatedly opened my door while I was resting, shook some kind of rattle and then violently slammed my door. Talk about passive-aggressive behavior. I can see perhaps doing this while a client refuses to participate during residential treatment, but not detox. Even when you’re sick and unable to keep your eyes open during detox, counselors expect you up to participate from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm. All the while, the nursing staff tells you that's not true, that it's okay to stay in bed while detoxing. This is a sugar-free facility, which is ironic given that AA's "Living Sober" text suggests SUGAR as a way to combat alcohol cravings. Meals were fair, but palatable snacks were lacking. Even though the kitchen didn't supply enough food for all clients, nurses would swoop in and fill their plates high for a freebie at mealtime. Clients are not allowed to bring in snacks or food from outside, yet some counselors say it's okay to buy candy during off-campus excursions to CVS. CVS? Are you kidding me? This is the LAST place I’d want to go while in treatment! Clients returned with bags of candy (that nurses would immediately toss in the trash) and complained of feeling unnerved by shoppers in line with copious amounts of alcohol. The detox rooms were filthy. When I arrived, I discovered mucous on the walls and on my "clean" sheets. In addition, the sheets are far too short for the beds there. A particular client left his feces-ridden towels strewn about a shared shower for others to move. He also refused to pick up after himself everywhere he went. While the nursing staff knew this was happening, nothing was done to effectively address the issue. Perhaps the worst part of my stay there related to a medical mistake whereby I was given an overdose of phenobarbital. I ended up being taken by ambulance to Oakland Kaiser ED--barely conscious and struggling to breathe. My husband spoke to Dr. Kayman (MPI's psychiatrist who’d just returned from vacation when I arrived). Dr. Kayman realized he had miscalculated my detox meds during intake. This led to HIS error in overprescribing phenobarbital for my detox. Yet, even after a drug screen ruled out my involvement, I was treated like a culprit throughout the remainder of my stay. The door slamming became more violent while I was recovering from being overdosed by Kayman. MPI may have been great in the past, but this place currently has too many burned out nurses and "fly by night" counselors to offset its ghetto taste and feel.
Treatment Effectiveness
Accommodations & Amenities
Meals & Nutrition
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1.7
N/A
If you're looking for a stressful and dirty environment and a chance of being overdosed, you've found the right place. According to one of MPI's very unprofessional nurses, management is no longer allowing unused vacation or sick time to be cashed out or rolled into another year. Employees must use or lose their time before year's end. Consequently, at any given point, half of the staff is out on vacation and replaced by what she termed "fly by night" incompetent staff. Because of the constant shifts in staff, there is extremely poor continuity of care. Connect with a counselor and two days later, he or she is replaced with a brittle and bossy fill-in. I attended MPI for detox services only, but during my seven days there I encountered inept nurses with control issues who refused to share vitals with clients or medicate them on time. Several of the nurses there backstabbed each other and the counselors repeatedly in front of clients. It was unprofessional at best and toxic to clients at worst. My first three days in detox were uncomfortable but okay. This is most likely because I arrived just before the weekend. As soon as Monday arrived, someone repeatedly opened my door while I was resting, shook some kind of rattle and then violently slammed my door. Talk about passive-aggressive behavior. I can see doing this while a client remains in bed during residential treatment, but not detox. Even when you are sick and unable to keep your eyes open during detox, counselors expect you to participate from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm. All the while, the nursing staff tells you that's not true; that it's okay to stay in bed while detoxing. This is a sugar-free facility, which is ironic given that AA's "Staying Sober" text suggests SUGAR as a way to combat alcohol cravings. Meals were fair, but palatable snacks were lacking. Even though the kitchen didn’t supply enough food for all clients, nurses would swoop in and fill their plates high for a freebie. Clients are not allowed to bring in snacks or food from outside, yet some counselors say it's okay to buy candy during the once-a-week trip to CVS. CVS? Are you kidding me? This is the LAST place I would want to go while in treatment! Clients returned with bags of candy (that nurses would immediately toss in the trash) and complained of feeling unnerved by shoppers in line with large amounts of alcohol. The detox rooms were filthy. When I arrived, I found mucous on the walls and on my "clean" sheets. In addition, the sheets are far too short for the beds there. A particular client left his feces-ridden towels strewn about the shared shower for others to deal with. He also refused to pick up after himself everywhere he went. While the nursing staff knew this was happening, nothing was done to address the issue. Perhaps the worst part of my stay there related to a medical mistake whereby I was given an overdose of phenobarbital. I ended up being taken by ambulance to Oakland Kaiser ED--barely conscious and struggling to breathe. My husband spoke to Dr. Kayman (MPI's psychiatrist who had just returned from vacation when I arrived). Dr. Kayman realized he had written down the wrong information gathered during my intake. This led to HIS error in overprescribing phenobarbital for my detox. Yet, even after a drug screen ruled out my involvement, I was treated like a criminal throughout the remainder of my stay. The door slamming became louder and more violent while I was recovering from being overdosed by Kayman. MPI may have been great in the past, but this place currently has too many burned out nurses and "fly by night" counselors to offset its ghetto taste and feel.
Treatment Effectiveness
Accommodations & Amenities
Meals & Nutrition
More
1.7
N/A
If you're looking for a stressful and dirty environment and a chance of being overdosed, you've found the right place. According to one of MPI's very unprofessional nurses, management is no longer allowing unused vacation or sick time to be cashed out or rolled into another year. Employees must use or lose their time before year's end. Consequently, at any given point, half of the staff is out on vacation and replaced by what she termed "fly by night" incompetent staff. Because of the constant shifts in staff, there is extremely poor continuity of care. Connect with a counselor and two days later, he or she is replaced with a brittle and bossy fill-in. I attended MPI for detox services only, but during my seven days there I encountered inept nurses with control issues who refused to share vitals with clients or medicate them on time. Several of the nurses there backstabbed each other and the counselors repeatedly in front of clients. It was unprofessional at best and toxic to clients at worst. My first three days in detox were uncomfortable but okay. This is most likely because I arrived just before the weekend. As soon as Monday arrived, someone repeatedly opened my door while I was resting, shook some kind of rattle and then violently slammed my door. Talk about passive-aggressive behavior. I can see doing this while a client remains in bed during residential treatment, but not detox. Even when you are sick and unable to keep your eyes open during detox, counselors expect you to participate from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm. All the while, the nursing staff tells you that's not true; that it's okay to stay in bed while detoxing. This is a sugar-free facility, which is ironic given that AA's "Staying Sober" text suggests SUGAR as a way to combat alcohol cravings. Meals were fair, but palatable snacks were lacking. Even though the kitchen didn’t supply enough food for all clients, nurses would swoop in and fill their plates high for a freebie. Clients are not allowed to bring in snacks or food from outside, yet some counselors say it's okay to buy candy during the once-a-week trip to CVS. CVS? Are you kidding me? This is the LAST place I would want to go while in treatment! Clients returned with bags of candy (that nurses would immediately toss in the trash) and complained of feeling unnerved by shoppers in line with large amounts of alcohol. The detox rooms were filthy. When I arrived, I found mucous on the walls and on my "clean" sheets. In addition, the sheets are far too short for the beds there. A particular client left his feces-ridden towels strewn about the shared shower for others to deal with. He also refused to pick up after himself everywhere he went. While the nursing staff knew this was happening, nothing was done to address the issue. Perhaps the worst part of my stay there related to a medical mistake whereby I was given an overdose of phenobarbital. I ended up being taken by ambulance to Oakland Kaiser ED--barely conscious and struggling to breathe. My husband spoke to Dr. Kayman (MPI's psychiatrist who had just returned from vacation when I arrived). Dr. Kayman realized he had written down the wrong information gathered during my intake. This led to HIS error in overprescribing phenobarbital for my detox. Yet, even after a drug screen ruled out my involvement, I was treated like a criminal throughout the remainder of my stay. The door slamming became louder and more violent while I was recovering from being overdosed by Kayman. MPI may have been great in the past, but this place currently has too many burned out nurses and "fly by night" counselors to offset its ghetto taste and feel.
Treatment Effectiveness
Accommodations & Amenities
Meals & Nutrition
More
1.7
N/A
According to one of MPI's very unprofessional nurses, management is no longer allowing unused vacation or sick time to be cashed out or rolled into another year. Employees must use or lose their time before year's end. Consequently, at any given point, half of the staff is out on vacation and replaced by what she termed "fly by night" incompetent staff. Because of the constant shifts in staff, there is extremely poor continuity of care. Connect with a counselor and two days later, he or she is replaced with a brittle and bossy fill-in. I attended MPI for detox services only, but during my seven days there I encountered inept nurses with control issues who refused to share vitals with clients or medicate them on time. Several of the nurses there backstabbed each other and the counselors repeatedly in front of clients. It was unprofessional at least and toxic to clients at worst. My first three days in detox were uncomfortable but okay. This is most likely because I arrived just before the weekend. As soon as Monday arrived, someone repeatedly opened my door while I was resting, shook some kind of rattle and then violently slammed my door. Talk about passive-aggressive behavior. I can see doing this while a client remains in bed during residential treatment, but not detox. Even when you are sick and unable to keep your eyes open during detox, counselors expect you to participate from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm. All the while, the nursing staff tells you that's not true; that it's okay to stay in bed while detoxing. This is a sugar-free facility, which is ironic given that AA's "Staying Sober" text suggests SUGAR as a way to combat alcohol cravings. Meals were fair, but palatable snacks were lacking. Clients are not allowed to bring in snacks or food from outside, yet some counselors say it's okay to buy candy during the once-a-week trip to CVS. CVS? Are you kidding me? This is the LAST place I would want to go while in treatment! Clients returned with bags of candy that ended up in the trash and complained of feeling unnerved by shoppers in line with large amounts of alcohol. The detox rooms were filthy. When I arrived, I found mucous on the walls and on my "clean" sheets. In addition, the sheets are far too short for the beds there. A particular client left his feces-ridden towels strewn about the shared shower for others to deal with. He also refused to pick up after himself everywhere he went. While the nursing staff knew this was happening, nothing was done to address the issue. Perhaps the worst part of my stay there related to a medical mistake whereby I was given an overdose of phenobarbital. I ended up being taken by ambulance to Oakland Kaiser ED--barely conscious and struggling to breathe. My husband spoke to Dr. Kayman (MPI's psychiatrist who had just returned from vacation when I arrived). Dr. Kayman realized he had written down the wrong information gathered during my intake. This led to HIS error in overprescribing phenobarbital for my detox. Yet, even after a drug screen ruled out my involvement, I was treated accordingly throughout the remainder of my stay. The door slamming became louder and more violent while I was recovering from being overdosed by Kayman. MPI may have been great in the past, but this place currently has too many burned out nurses and "fly by night" counselors to offset its ghetto taste and feel.
Treatment Effectiveness
Accommodations & Amenities
Meals & Nutrition
More
1.3
N/A
If you're looking for a stressful and dirty environment and a chance of being overdosed, you've found the right place. According to one of MPI’s very unprofessional nurses, management is no longer allowing unused vacation or sick time to be cashed out or rolled into another year. Employees must use or lose their time before year’s end. Consequently, at any given point, half of the staff is out on vacation and replaced by what she termed “fly by night” incompetent staff. Because of the constant shifts in staff, there is extremely poor continuity of care. Connect with a counselor and two days later, he or she is replaced with a brittle and bossy fill-in. I attended MPI for detox services only, but during my seven days there I encountered inept nurses with control issues who refused to share vitals with clients or medicate them on time. Several of the nurses there backstabbed each other and the counselors repeatedly in front of clients. It was unprofessional at least and toxic to clients at worst. My first three days in detox were uncomfortable but okay. This is most likely because I arrived just before the weekend. As soon as Monday arrived, someone repeatedly opened my door while I was resting, shook some kind of rattle and then violently slammed my door. Talk about passive-aggressive behavior. I can see doing this while a client remains in bed during residential treatment, but not detox. Even when you are sick and unable to keep your eyes open during detox, counselors expect you to participate from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm. All the while, the nursing staff tells you that's not true; that it's okay to stay in bed while detoxing. This is a sugar-free facility, which is ironic given that AA’s “Staying Sober” text suggests SUGAR as a way to combat alcohol cravings. Meals were fair, but palatable snacks were lacking. Clients are not allowed to bring in snacks or food from outside, yet some counselors say it's okay to buy candy during the once-a-week trip to CVS. CVS? Are you kidding me? This is the LAST place I would want to go while in treatment! Clients returned with bags of candy that ended up in the trash and complained of feeling unnerved by shoppers in line with large amounts of alcohol. The detox rooms were filthy. When I arrived, I found mucous on the walls and on my “clean” sheets. In addition, the sheets are far too short for the beds there. A particular client left his feces-ridden towels strewn about the shared shower for others to deal with. He also refused to pick up after himself everywhere he went. While the nursing staff knew this was happening, nothing was done to address the issue. Perhaps the worst part of my stay there related to a medical mistake whereby I was given an overdose of phenobarbital. I ended up being taken by ambulance to Oakland Kaiser ED—barely conscious and struggling to breathe. My husband spoke to Dr. Kayman (MPI’s psychiatrist who had just returned from vacation when I arrived). Dr. Kayman realized he had written down the wrong information gathered during my intake. This led to HIS error in overprescribing phenobarbital for my detox. Yet, even after a drug screen ruled out my involvement, it was put into my chart that I had overdosed MYSELF. I was treated accordingly throughout the remainder of my stay. The door slamming became louder and more violent while I was recovering from being overdosed by Kayman. My medical record now reads that I overdosed myself, and I am being treated accordingly by Kaiser staff in Walnut Creek. MPI may have been great in the past, but this place currently has too many burned out nurses and “fly by night” counselors to offset its ghetto taste and feel.
Treatment Effectiveness
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No Rating
M.P.I. saved my life!
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5.0
Excellent
They had good knowledge
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No Rating
I entered MPI in October 1996 at 36 very tired and very broken. The Staff and program was extremely helpful in starting a new beginning in my life. I followed the program\'s advice and lived in a clean and sober house for about a year after 5 weeks In house treatment. I have been sober and clean ever since. I am an alcoholic and a drug addict and always will be. I just don\'t live that life anymore. Thank you for saving my life.
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4.3
Great
If you stay in contact with the staff, the program and follow your after care plan.. you will stay sober. I had relapsed after 3 years. I didnt want to go back to treatment and I had lost my job so I didn't have that kind of insurance.
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3.3
Good
You need to have your person stay overnight if you actually want it to work. It didn't work or really help.
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3.3
Good
...[My son's] neurologist requested the doctor to call before making any medication changes and they refused to. Believe me you that was not acceptable. One guy got on him but not until the doctor was leaving for a 2 week vacation. My son's counselor suggested he has issues that were outside of her training...They do not call clients on their crud and are disorganized. The facility tells on a regular basis clients that relapse is part of recovery. WE are a family in 12 step recovery and we call bs to that. It can happen but to put it in their minds is wrong in our opinions and experience. They do not offer true recovery which begins with self honesty. They had great concepts but no follow through.The counselor at the family meeting was so full of herself she could not even connect.
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5.0
Excellent
I have had family and friends in this facility. The staff is superior. This is the best facility I've worked in in 28 years in the field. The Monitoring and Re-entry program is awesome.
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