Find a Drug and Alcohol Abuse Rehab Center in Alaska

Many Alaskans know the wreckage that substance abuse and addiction can cause, from ongoing health issues to damaged relationships to financial ruin. Once addiction takes hold, stopping drug use can feel impossible; however, with professional treatment, recovery can happen. You don’t have to wait to reach out for help if you or someone you love is suffering. There are a multitude of treatment options available. Browse Alaska rehab listings now to begin your path to sobriety.

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AK Substance Abuse Facts

Heroin and prescription drugs are among the most commonly abused substances in Alaska, according to a 2016 drug report from the Alaska State Troopers.1

Alaska has seen a huge increase in the abuse of opioids (which includes heroin and painkillers) in the past several years. Between 2013 and 2015, heroin abuse rates increased significantly from 0.7% to 1.23%.2 Heroin overdose deaths have increased every year in Alaska since 2010. In 2012, the rate of overdose deaths involving prescription painkillers was more than twice the national rate, and AK’s rate of heroin-involved overdose deaths was more than 50% higher than the national rate.3 These opioid abuse numbers are also reflected in the numbers of people in treatment for opioid addiction. In 2015, in a single-day count, 331 people in Alaska received methadone in opioid addiction treatment programs as part of their substance abuse treatment—an increase from 148 in 2012.2

Alcohol is also at the top of list of abused substances in Alaska. Between 2014 and 2015, alcohol use in the state was above the national average for adolescents (11% vs. 10.6%), and the number of adults with a diagnosable alcohol use disorder in that year also topped the national average (7.4% vs. 6.1%).2

Substance abuse in the state may be driven in part by (and may also worsen) mental health issues, specifically depression. Alaska has the second-highest suicide rate in the country, with 27.1 suicides per 100,000 residents. The national rate is 13.3 per 100,000.4

Getting Addiction Treatment Help

Before you decide to get help, think about what kind of program is the best fit for you. For example, if you’ve relapsed in the past, inpatient rehab may be an optimal choice because it can provide more supervision, more intensive care, as well as some distance between you and potential relapse triggers.

Also think about whether you would rather travel out of state for treatment or stay close to home so it’s easier for your family and friends to visit and be a part of your treatment.

If you or someone you care about needs help for drug or alcohol abuse, you can call us anytime at 1-888-744-0069Who Answers?. One of our treatment support advisors will be happy to help you locate a program either near you or in another city/state.

Where Else Can I Find Help?

Cost is a concern for many people seeking addiction treatment. Many people also either aren’t insured or have limited coverage. If you’re worried about payment, ask the program about plans that let you pay off the cost of treatment over time.

Treatment centers also commonly offer sliding scale programs that will charge you a certain rate based on your income. Some even make scholarships available that cover all or a portion of the cost.

You can also see if you qualify for government-sponsored insurance plans such as Medicaid and Medicare.

Resources in Alaska

  • Alaska Medicaid: Learn whether you’re eligible for Medicaid, a federal-state insurance program that covers low-income residents. It can help pay for mental health and substance abuse care.
  • Alaska Alcoholics Anonymous meetings: Browse a list of meetings across the state.
  • Alaska Narcotics Anonymous meetings: Find links to meetings in cities around the state.
  • Alaska Careline: This hotline helps people who are contemplating suicide or are in the midst of a crisis.
  • Substance abuse treatment providers: The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services’ Division of Behavioral Health lists residential and outpatient programs in the state.
  • Drug take-back events: The Alaska Pharmacists Association offers prescription drug take-back events that let you drop off any unused medications to prevent abuse and diversion. Check their website for upcoming events.
  • Alaska 2-1-1: Find services for a variety of issues, including emergency food and shelter, housing, legal assistance, healthcare, and drug and alcohol recovery programs.
  • NAMI Alaska: Find resources and information regarding mental health from the Alaska chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.
Sources:
  1. Alaska State Troopers. (2016). Annual Drug Report.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Behavioral Health Barometer: Alaska, Volume 4: Indicators as measured through the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services, and the Uniform Reporting System. HHS Publication No. SMA–17–Baro–16–States–AK. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2017.
  3. State of Alaska Epidemiology. (2016). Drug Overdose Deaths in Alaska, 2009-2015.
  4. com. (2017). Alaska suicide rate is highest in at least 20 years.

 

 

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