Find a Drug and Alcohol Abuse Rehab Center in Maine

Abusing drugs and alcohol can have severe consequences on your well-being, including an increased risk of addiction and pre-mature death. However, you don’t have to live with addiction. You can take your first step today by scrolling through our directory listings and narrowing down your search for a treatment program in Maine that will best suit your own path to sobriety.

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ME Substance Abuse Facts 

In Maine, a state with an estimated population of over 1.3 million people, prescription drug abuse continues to be a serious public health problem.1

Below are some key facts to understand the scope of substance abuse in Maine:1,2

  • In 2015, 272 people died from a drug or alcohol overdose—representing a 55% increase since 2013.
  • In 2015, 4 out of 5 overdose deaths involved an opioid.
  • 3 out of 10 overdose deaths were benzodiazepine-related.
  • Heroin use is on the rise and is most prevalent in the southern and coastal parts of the state including York, Cumberland, Androscoggin, Kennebec, and Knox.
  • The number of deaths related to heroin, morphine, or fentanyl nearly doubled between 2014 and 2015.
  • In 2015, there were more than 1,000 notifications to Child Protective Services of babies exposed to drugs or alcohol.
  • Of all infants born in 2015 in the state, 8% had already been exposed to drugs or alcohol at birth.
  • In 2010, the cost of substance abuse in Maine was estimated to be over $1.4 billion.

Getting Addiction Treatment Help

Across the state, alcohol remains the most commonly used substance, followed by tobacco, marijuana, and prescription drugs.1 In 2015, more than 1 in 3 treatment centers listed alcohol abuse as the primary reason for patient admission, followed by heroin use. The number of people seeking treatment for heroin-related substance use disorders has risen steadily over the past 5 years, exceeding synthetic opiates (such as fentanyl). Among pregnant women, more than 8 out of 10 admissions to substance abuse treatment are related to opioids.1

Given the serious medical, social, and personal harm that addiction can place on an individual, it’s important to seek treatment. You can begin by calling treatment centers and seeing what services they offer. If you have insurance, it will likely pay for some basic treatment services.

It’s a good idea to make a list of questions beforehand, including cost and payment options, what types of insurance plans are accepted at the facility, room types (private vs. shared), visitor policies, and so on. For additional help finding the treatment center that’s right for you, call 1-888-744-0069Who Answers? today to speak to a support specialist.

Where Else Can I Find Help?

For many people, cost of rehab remains a huge barrier in seeking treatment. If you do not have insurance or enough money to cover the cost of private rehab, there are ways you can get care. For example, many centers offer services based on a sliding scale, meaning that you can pay what you can based on your income.

If you are searching for a treatment program in your area, you can use SAMHSA’s free treatment locator tool. Once you enter your zip code, you can view the rehab centers in your area. You can ask the center about payment options, and what resources they offer for someone who does not have funds or insurance. There may also be local resources that help people in addiction recovery get the help they need. For example, the Portland Recovery Community Center located at 468 Forest Ave. in Portland, Maine, offers all services free of charge. You can reach them by calling (207) 553-2575.

Resources in Maine

Below is a list of resources in Maine that can help you find treatment, get involved with community groups, and get assistance with other needs such as insurance, housing, and food:

Sources:
  1. Maine Department of Health and Human Services. (2016). Substance Abuse Trends in Maine. State Epidemiological Profile 2016.
  2. Department of Health and Human Services. (2015). SEOW Special Report: Heroin, Opioids, and Other Drugs in Maine.
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