Find a Drug and Alcohol Abuse Rehab Center in Vermont

No matter where you are in America, drug and alcohol abuse will touch you—whether personally or through someone in your family, friend group, neighborhood, or community. Addiction is a mental health disorder that continues to affect millions of people every day. With some drugs, notably opioids, the number of those who succumb to fatal overdoses is on the rise. Access to quality treatment is essential to prevent further suffering and offer hope to those who need it.

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VT Substance Abuse Facts 

In Vermont, recent surveys (2014-15) about drug- and alcohol-related behaviors help to quantify the extent of substance abuse behavior and the number of state residents struggling with addiction:1–4

  • 10% of teenagers between the ages of 12 and 17 said they had used marijuana in the past month.
  • In the same age group, 13.2% said they had used alcohol within the last month.
  • Of Vermont residents 12 and older, an estimated 7% had an alcohol use disorder.
  • Nearly 330,000 Vermonters said they’d consumed alcohol in the last month.
  • A state website reports that in 2015, there were 76 accidental opioid deaths, and a national survey shows that in Vermont, more than triple the number of people received methadone for opioid treatment in 2015 than did in 2011.
  • Among all Americans, nearly 4 million currently abuse prescription painkillers.

Getting Addiction Treatment Help

Given numbers like these, it’s clear that many individuals would benefit from finding the right substance abuse treatment. Not only can treatment help you reclaim the parts of your life that may have been compromised due to your addiction, but it can truly save your life.

Starting right here on this page, you can search reputable and vetted treatment centers via the state and city directory. See which facilities are nearby in Vermont, or explore other areas of the country. Sometimes people prefer the comfort of a familiar place close to home for rehab, while others need a break from their everyday environment to focus solely on their recovery—either way, you can find options here.

If you’d rather speak to a real person, call an experienced treatment consultant at 1-888-744-0069Who Answers? to discuss what options are available to you, given the specific details of your circumstance.

Contacting your health insurance provider is another starting point for you to find out which programs are covered and learn more about them. Most plans have out-of-network options too, and while they don’t always cover the full cost of treatment, even having some portion paid makes treatment feasible for many people.

Where Else Can I Find Help?

Even if you don’t have insurance or many financial resources, there are still many good options, beginning with state programs. The state Medicaid program has provisions for substance abuse treatment for those who meet income requirements, and they can direct you to participating treatment providers.

A community health clinic can often make a referral to a good substance abuse treatment program or therapist, as can your personal physician or therapist.

Many churches and other nonprofit or charitable organizations have lists of local treatment providers, and some even offer grants or scholarships to help you pay for it. Calling their administrative office is usually the best place to start.

It’s often surprising for people to learn that treatment centers will work with you financially. From payment plans tailored to fit your budget, to sliding scales, to partial or full scholarships, there are many ways treatment centers can help you afford your substance abuse treatment.

Regardless of where you turn to find addictions treatment, the most important thing is not to give up until you get the help you need.

Resources in Vermont

Sources:
  1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2017). Behavioral Health Barometer: Vermont.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2016). State Estimates of Substance Abuse: Vermont.
  3. Vermont Department of Health. (2016). Opioids in Vermont: Prevalence, Risk, and Impact.
  4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2016). Key Substance Use and Mental Health Indicators in the United States: Results from the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.
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